Master of Arts in Homeland Security (MAHS)

The Aurora University Master of Arts in Homeland Security (MAHS) program is developed in partnership with the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security (CHDS).  As the pioneer for graduate education in homeland security, CHDS developed the nucleus of programs and resources utilized by homeland security professionals throughout America. Utilizing many of these resources, the Aurora University MAHS program provides students with the knowledge and skills to:

  • Develop strategies, plans, and programs to prevent, mitigate, and respond to disastrous events;
  • Build the organizational arrangements needed to strengthen homeland security, including local/tribal/state/federal, civil-military and interagency cooperation;
  • Improve homeland security preparedness by conducting “real world” actionable policy and strategy development;
  • Complete a capstone project on policy issues confronting local, state, federal, or private sector organizations.

Admission Requirements

Applicants to the Master of Arts in Homeland Security must submit each of the following:
  • Graduate Application for Admissions
  • Official transcripts for all prior college and/or university credit.
  • An earned bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution with a grade point average of 2.75/4.0. (Applicants with a GPA of less than 2.75 will be considered on a case-by-case basis.)
  • Two letters of recommendation.
  • Statement of Purpose – The statement of purpose is a typewritten, double-spaced 3-5 page narrative that describes your motivation and aspirations for becoming a professional or academic scholar in homeland security.  It should demonstrate the standards for graduate-level writing.  In doing so, please address the following:
    • Why are you seeking a master’s degree in homeland security studies?
    • What are your goals and objectives within your professional/academic aspirations?
    • Explain what it meant to demonstrate exemplary values and ethics in homeland security and how a graduate degree will assist you in your career.
    • Explain what you would like to see from your coursework and the faculty within the master’s program.
  • A resume detailing academic achievements, including honors and awards, extra-curricular activities, and relevant work, internship, and volunteer experiences.

The curriculum is structured around the key policy and organizational design problems that current and future homeland security leaders are likely to confront, as well as the analytical skills they will need to meet those challenges.

Students complete a total of 30 semester hours in the following courses:

CRJ5005: Introduction to Homeland Security (3)
CRJ5015: The Asymmetric Threat to Homeland Security (3)
CRJ5025: Cyber Security in the Information Age (3)
CRJ5035: Intelligence for Homeland Security (3)
CRJ5045: Critical Infrastructure: Vulnerability Analysis and Protection (3)
CRJ5055: Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management (3)
CRJ6015: Counter-Terrorism in the United Kingdom (3)
CRJ6035: Terrorist Financing and State Response (3)
CRJ6045: The Psychology of Fear Management and Terrorism (3)
CRJ6055: Multi-Discipline Approaches to Homeland Security: A Homeland Security Capstone Course (3)

This course provides an overview of the essential ideas that constitute the ever changing discipline of homeland security.  It has two central objectives: to expand the way participants think, analyze and communicate about homeland security; and to assess knowledge in critical homeland security knowledge domains.

Semester hours: 3

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the operational and organizational dynamics of terrorism. It considers those who act as individuals, in small groups or in large organizations; it considers indigenous actors as well as those who come to the United States to raise money, recruit or commit their acts of violence. In every instance, its focus is on violent clandestine activity that, whatever its motivation, has a political purpose or effect.

Semester hours: 3

This course provides individuals involved in homeland security a broad overview of homeland security technology, information systems, inspections and surveillance technology, communications, knowledge management and information security. The course focuses on technology as a tool to support homeland security personnel regardless of functional specialty. The methodology used in the course will frame technology in terms of its contribution to deterrence; preemption; prevention; protection; response after an attack.

Semester hours: 3

The 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon and the ensuing War on Terror have focused the nation’s attention on homeland security. This course examines key questions and issues facing the U.S. intelligence community and its role in homeland security and homeland defense. Students will have the opportunity to fully address policy, organizational and substantive issues regarding homeland intelligence support.

Semester hours: 3

This course develops a network theory of vulnerability analysis and risk assessment called “model-based vulnerability analysis” used to extract the critical nodes from each sector, model the nodes’ vulnerabilities by representing them in the form of a fault-tree, and then applying fault and financial risk reduction techniques to derive the optimal strategy for protection of each sector. At the completion of the course, students will be able to apply the model-based vulnerability technique to any critical infrastructure within their multi-jurisdictional region, and derive optimal strategies and draft policies for prevention of future terrorist attacks.

Semester hours: 3

The purpose of this course is to provide participants with an understanding of the risks and hazards associated with planned events as well as natural and man-made disasters.  The importance of an effective emergency response plan will be stressed and specific focus will be given to the recognition, planning, mitigation, response, and recovery from the risks from these types of events.

Semester hours: 3

This course addresses counterterrorism in the United Kingdom. Tracing the UK response to violent subnational terrorism back to its efforts against the PIRA in the 1970s through the 1990s, the course modules demonstrate how the UK counterterrorism community recognized long ago the serious threat to national security that subnational violence poses, and how its response to the recent violent terrorist activities of al-Qaeda is situated within an environment informed by the earlier “Irish Troubles.”

Semester hours: 3

The goal of this course is to develop the knowledge to critically assess claims about terrorist financing and the tools to think seriously about how to combat it.  Students will learn about how terrorist organizations raise, store, and transfer funds.  Specific attention will be given to how government agencies have addressed terrorist network funding.

Semester hours: 3

Service providers and government agencies involved in homeland security need to understand the psychological consequences of mass-casualty terrorist attacks and other disasters. This course serves as an introduction to terrorism as a psychological phenomenon for professionals who are charged with the responsibility providing needed services to communities faced with the tragedy of man-made or natural disasters.

Semester hours: 3

Homeland security efforts in the United States constitute a project framed by the rule of law. Constitutional concerns, civil rights issues and the roles of the various disciplines engaged in the effort are driven and impacted by the various local, state and federal systems of law. Multi-discipline Approaches to Homeland Security allows students to explore the homeland security project in relation to the laws that support and constrains it.

Semester hours: 3