Course Descriptions — Sociology

SOC1100 Introduction to Society 4 semester hours
This course is an introduction to the systematic study of human society. Students learn about the impact of society and culture on individuals and about the role of individuals in the construction of social life and culture. They develop their own sociological imagination and sociological mindfulness and learn how to apply the new skills to the interpretation of social reality and their own experience. They are introduced to the major social institutions and the basic processes of human interaction resulting in social change.
Meets General Education “Knowing Ourselves and Others” Group A requirement (for students entering Aurora University prior to Summer 2014).

SOC2150 Cultural Anthropology 4 semester hours
This course introduces students to culture defined as a key aspect of human adaptability and success. Students learn about the process of development of our essentially human characteristics, both biological and cultural, including language, customs, and institutions that make up the ways of life of social groups. A cross-cultural analysis of societies and the multiple functions of culture are discussed. Students are encouraged to develop cultural self-awareness and selfreflection, reduce ethnocentrism, and create new ways of understanding of their own culture.
Meets General Education “Knowing Ourselves and Others” Group A requirement (for students entering Aurora University prior to Summer 2014).

SOC/CRJ2300 Criminology 4 semester hours
Cross-listed with CRJ2300. For description, see CRJ2300.
Meets General Education “Knowing Ourselves and Others” Group B requirement (for students entering Aurora University prior to Summer 2014).

SOC3350 Race, Ethnicity, and Power 4 semester hours
This course focuses on the sociological analysis of minority groups as they interact with the dominant culture in which they reside. It develops students’ awareness, understanding, and appreciation for the unique experience of distinct racial and ethnic groups. The complexity of the fabric of social life and the fluidity of thedominant and subordinate status in society are discussed. Stereotypes, prejudices, and discrimination of a wide range of social categories, from age, gen der, and race to social class, religion, and ability and the role they play in the shap ing of the structures of power are also analyzed.
Prerequisite: SOC1100 or SOC2150.
Meets General Education “Knowing Ourselves and Others” Group A requirement (for students entering Aurora University prior to Summer 2014).

SOC/PSC3400 Social Problems and Public Policies 4 semester hours
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to important social and political problems and policies from a cross-societal perspective. The fundamental questions ask about the origins of social problems and policies that are developed to solve them. The course focuses on the social construction of social problems, and on the role played by the power elites, social experts, media and social movements in the process of that construction. The strengths and weaknesses of governmental programs and regulations and of market-based solutions of these problems also are discussed. The role of volunteerism and philanthropy is analyzed, and so are the unanticipated consequences of politically motivated reforms.
Prerequisite: SOC1100 or PSC1500.

SOC/PSY3430 Gender, Sexuality and Society 4 semester hours
This course focuses on the analysis of the biological, psychological, and social aspects of human sexuality and gender. Topics include human sexuality over the course of life, sex, love, and mate selection, sexual diversity, sexual violence, and the changing relationship between sexuality and various social institutions (e.g., family) and elements of culture (e.g., religion). The discussion also focuses on the interplay between sexuality and gender, on gender development across the life span, and across cultures, the changes in gender expectations over time, and gender in the context of various social institutions. The multicultural and global perspectives constitute the framework for the discussion.
Prerequisite: SOC1100 or PSY1100.

SOC/PSY3450 Social and Applied Psychology 4 semester hours
Cross-listed with PSY3450. For description, see PSY3450.

SOC/PSC3480 Globalization and Social Change 4 semester hours
This course focuses on the trends in economic, political, social, and cultural globalization, hybridization, fragmentation, and on selected local/community phenomena related to those macro/global changes that occur in our times. Elements of world-systems theory and the theory of culture change, theories of social stratification, of the origin and perpetuation of inequalities in society and in the world, in combination with other current approaches to the explanation of human experience both on the macro and micro levels, will be explored. Questions related to ethics, human rights, individualization, consumerism, politics, and to growing awareness of the ambivalence of human experience will be debated.
Prerequisite: SOC1100 or PSC1500

SOC/PSY3500 Research and Statistical Methods 4 semester hours
Cross-listed with PSY3500. For description, see PSY3500.

SOC/PSC3550 Politics of Intimate Relations 4 semester hours
This course applies a historical, comparative and global approach to the study of social and political forces that shape patterns of mate selection, dating, intimate relationships, power relations, conflicts and violence among members of intimate relationships, and of the dissolution of such relations with all its consequences. The issues related to parent-child dynamic and the problems that emerge in single- parent, multi-generational, transitional, same-sex or blended families are also taken into consideration. The issues of individual and population aging are contextualized by broader interpersonal, familial, social and political perspectives. The role of contemporary media representation of intimate relations and their challenges is included in the analysis.
Prerequisite: SOC1100 or PSC1500.

SOC/PSC3600 Theory and Methods of Social Scientific Analysis 4 semester hours
Cross-listed with PSC3600. For description, see PSC3600.

SOC/PSC3610 The Politics of European Integration 4 semester hours
Cross-listed with PSC3610. For description, see PSC3610.

SOC/PSC/BIO3700 Politics of Global Health and Medicine 4 semester hours
The course addresses the question of how social and political factors, such as race, nationality or social class, as well as governmental laws, regulations and politics shape and are shaped by individual and population health and well-being around the world. Among other questions, students discuss the impact of structural violence of social inequalities on human suffering and on the access to health care and medical care, including access to medications. The ethicality of medical research is also included in that discussion. Assigned readings and discussions address 1) the determinants of disease and health inequalities between populations and over time; 2) how social and political factors influence medical knowledge, health care and medical care; and 3) what must be done to combat and prevent health inequalities in local, national and global contexts.
Prerequisite: SOC1100 or PSC1500 or SOC2150.
Highly Recommended: SOC/PSC3480 or BIO3540.

SOC4310 Seminar in Sociological Theory I 4 semester hours
The course is an invitation to the field of sociology, with an examination of prevailing sociological perspectives and their relation to researchable questions. Readings from classical sociological theorists on selected topics build the foun dations for students’ individual research. Examples of the past conceptualizations of specific social and cultural issues broaden students’ perspective of sociology as a discipline. Students explore research methodology including sampling and questionnaire construction. They select a research topic and conduct a review of relevant sociological literature, analyzing the literature in terms of sociological perspectives as well as content. They also prepare the tools necessary for the empirical part of their research. (Every other year)
Prerequisites: SOC3350; SOC/PSC3480.

SOC4320 Seminar in Sociological Theory II 4 semester hours
The course is a continuation of the examination of pre vailing sociological perspectives and their relation to researchable questions. Readings from contemporary and postmodern sociological theorists on selected topics build the foundations for students’ individual research. Examples of the most recent conceptualizations of specific social and cultural issues broaden students’ perspective of sociology as a discipline. Students conduct their research project initiated during the course of SOC4310, collect data, analyze and interpret them and write the final paper. (Every other year following SOC4310)
Prerequisite: SOC4310.

SOC/PSC4500 Human Rights and Social Justice 4 semester hours
The course focuses on both domestic and international issues related to violation of human and/or civil rights, to various forms of intra- and international violence, and social injustice. Selected examples of economic, social and cultural victim ization, wars, genocidal and terrorist actions are explored. The resulting health care challenges, such as malnutrition, HIV/AIDS, trafficking of humans and human organs are also included. Issues of nonviolent social change, peaceful con flict resolution, and possibilities for a “new world order” are analyzed.
Prerequisites: SOC/PSC3400 and SOC/PSC3480.

SOC2940, 3940, 4940 Community Internship 2–4 semester hours
Students are individually placed with community organizations and agencies where they work and acquire professional experience. The internship is recommended for students in their junior or senior year. The internship gives students an opportunity to learn the daily operation of community institutions and to develop skills they need to work in culturally diverse contexts. At the same time, students apply their sociological imagination and mindfulness developed in the classroom as well as their knowledge of sociological theories to the interpretation of the directly observed and experienced aspects of social life.
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.